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Robertson Nil Akwei Allotey

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C
Focus Area(s)
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2
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Ashley McCants
Name
Robertson Nil Akwei Allotey
Interviewee's Position
Chief Director
Interviewee's Organization
Ministry of Public Sector Reform
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Ghanaian
Town/City
Accra
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Robertson Nil Akwei Allotey explains the history of civil service reform in Ghana and the National Institutional Renewal Program. Phase 1 of the program began in 1994 and ended in 2000. It redefined the mission of the ministries and set out methods to improve the delivery of services to the citizenry and to publicize the services offered to the public. The Civil Service Improvement Program analyzed ministries, departments and agencies to reorganize them, to decide on the optimal size, to retrain, and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness in service delivery with attention to work ethics and transparency. The first task was to reduce political and social influence in recruitment and promotion by open civil service examinations and performance assessments carried out by retired senior civil servants. In Phase I, a “single spine” pay policy was instituted to insure pay equity. Increases in salary were based on performance. In Phase II, emphasis was placed on private sector growth for the government’s development agenda. He says that the reform effort targeted all public agencies, not just the civil service, with decentralization and the restructuring of central management agencies with emphasis on procurement and records management and information technology as support interventions. The major reform initiatives were part of the government’s poverty reduction strategy program, which was linked to the Millennium Development goals developed by the United Nations.

Profile

At the time of this interview, Robertson Allotey had been acting chief director at the Ministry of Public Sector Reform in Ghana for six months.  Allotey began his career in civil service reform in 1998, when he was the director in charge of the Customer Services Improvement Unit in the office of the head of civil service. He earned a master’s degree in urban policy and housing and was particularly interested in the accessibility of urban housing stock and what factors made people content with their environments. Improvement of public service delivery to citizens played an important role and prepared him for his work with the civil service to improve delivery of services. 

Full Audio File Size
114 MB
Full Audio Title
Robertson Allotey - Full Interview

Alfred Drosaye

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Y
Focus Area(s)
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3
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Jonathan (Yoni) Friedman
Name
Alfred Drosaye
Interviewee's Position
Principal Administrative Officer
Interviewee's Organization
Liberian Civil Service
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Liberia
Place (Building/Street)
Civil Service Agency
Town/City
Monrovia
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Alfred Drosaye describes the push for pay and pension reform in 2006 after the inauguration of the new president, Ellen Sirleaf-Johnson. He talks about the strategies to clear the civil service payroll of ghost workers. He describes the make-up and training of the teams sent into the counties to vet each worker and enroll the workers in the Biometric ID system which, among other benefits, enabled workers to receive pay via direct deposit.

Case Studies: Cleaning the Civil Service Payroll: Post-Conflict Liberia, 2008-2011 and Building Civil Service Capacity: Post-Conflict Liberia, 2006-2011

Profile

At the time of this interview, Alfred Drosaye was the principal administrative officer in the Liberian Civil Service and the project director for the Biometric Program in the Human Resource Management Services Directory of the Civil Service.  His position required him to manage three directories in the civil service: employment, human services management and career and training.  He joined the civil service in 1997 as an analytical secretary and rose to assistant director and then director of Classification Selection Standards.  As the principal director, he was in charge of the review of public employment.

Full Audio File Size
89 MB
Full Audio Title
Alfred Drosaye Interview

Fatbardh Kadilli

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D
Focus Area(s)
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13
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Jona Repishti
Name
Fatbardh Kadilli
Interviewee's Position
Adviser to the Prime Minister
Interviewee's Organization
Albania
Language
Albanian
Nationality of Interviewee
Albanian
Town/City
Tirana
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Fatbardh Kadilli, adviser to Albania's prime minister on anti-corruption policies, presents his views on the efforts to reform public administration. He says that the country adopted Western models for reform legislation and implementation, but that breaking old habits acquired under the former communist system was difficult. He believes that protecting civil servants from arbitrary firing impeded efforts to modernize the government because so many administrators were still in positions where they could not perform. He describes the difficulties of trying to institute a successful performance management system because Albania had few leaders who understand management. He reports on initiatives to downsize and consolidate ministries and to install Internet-based systems to reduce corruption in procurement, licensing and a number of other public services.

Profile

At the time of this interview, Fatbardh Kadilli was adviser to the prime minister on anti-corruption matters, a position he had held since 2005.  Prior to that he served for four years as a consultant on anti-corruption with an American firm financed by the U.S. Agency for International Development. Prior to that he led a program on integrated services for children at UNICEF. From 1998 to 2005, he was also a consultant with the Institute for Contemporary Studies, where, among other tasks, he advised the government on decentralization reforms. Earlier, he served in the State Secretariat for Local Governance, where he was in charge of the Refugee Office and drafted the law on asylum seekers.

Full Audio File Size
78 MB
Full Audio Title
Fatbardh Kadilli - Full Interview

David Beretti

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Y
Focus Area(s)
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1
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Michael Woldemariam
Name
David Beretti
Interviewee's Position
Executive Director of Corporate Services
Interviewee's Organization
City of Cape Town, South Africa
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
South African
Town/City
Cape Town
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

David Beretti recounts his experiences working with the city of Cape Town. While Beretti had a 38-year experience with the city government at the time, he focuses on his body of work as the executive director of corporate services. He begins his discussion by detailing the efforts to reform the many municipalities of Cape Town down to one streamlined unit. He discusses the many challenges the government of Cape Town faced in instituting this reform. First, he recounts discussion surrounding the sequence of reforms. He details the efforts to work with the collective bargaining organizations that originally opposed the reforms. Faced with a short deadline of only six months, he explains the innovations that were created in order to address redundant positions that existed among the pervious seven municipalities while avoiding serious retrenchment. Beretti also explains the outside accountability measures used to ensure the cooperation and satisfaction of the City of Cape Town’s employees. This included a large-scale survey and performance monitoring system for the reform process. He concludes his detailed discussion with information on how diversity was handled in the recruitment and promotion process.    

Case Study:  Municipal Turnaround in Cape Town, South Africa, 2006-2009

Profile

At the time of the interview, David Beretti was the executive director of corporate services for the City of Cape Town, having worked for the city for 38 years. Beretti previously held positions in the finance, engineering, planning and human resources departments of the City of Cape Town. In his current position, he is responsible for the full human resource functions for 25,000 employees.  He also manages the legal services, information systems and technology departments. During his time as executive director of corporate services, Beretti oversaw the reformation of Cape Town from an original 39 municipalities in to one streamlined city government.    

Full Audio File Size
187 MB
Full Audio Title
David Beretti - Full Interview

Zef Preci

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D
Focus Area(s)
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6
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Jona Repishti
Name
Zef Preci
Interviewee's Position
Research Director
Interviewee's Organization
Albanian Center for Economic Research
Language
Albanian
Nationality of Interviewee
Albanian
Town/City
Tirana
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Zef Preci, head of the independent, non-governmental Albanian Center for Economic Research, critically assesses progress and setbacks in Albania’s civil service reforms. He says that despite a civil service law aimed at creating a merit-based civil service insulated from politics, the hiring and firing of civil servants had become highly politicized and retained many of the characteristics of the former communist system. The focus is upon patronage rather than services to the public. He is critical of international donors for looking the other way. He believes that the army and police have been de-politicized and were forces for good.

Profile

At the time of this interview, Zef Preci was the founding head of the independent, non-governmental Albanian Center for Economic Research, established in 1992 as Albania's first independent, non-governmental organization dedicated to research and analysis in support of a market economy and democracy. He served briefly in 2000 as the minister of public economy and privatization before he returned to ACER as its director. Later, he was an adviser to Albania's president and chairman of the Authority for Competition.  During his career, he also was a lecturer in entrepreneurial economics at Tirana University.

Full Audio File Size
61 MB
Full Audio Title
Zef Preci - Full Interview

Ciro Fernandes

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V
Focus Area(s)
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2
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Rushda Majeed
Name
Ciro Fernandes
Interviewee's Position
Program Director and Special Adviser
Interviewee's Organization
Brazilian Ministry of Administration and State Reform
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Brazilian
Town/City
Brasilia
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Ciro Fernandes recounts his experience in Bresser-Pereira's team in the Ministry of Administration and State Reform. The initial reform team was recruited from pools in the larger civil service bureaucracy, the Secretariat for Federal Administration that served as immediate basis for the Ministry, and Bresser-Pereira's university network. The first mandate under President Cardoso focused on articulation of specific goals for the reform program, including (i) decentralization of public administration, especially for service delivery; (ii) development of performance indicators with support from international consultants; (iii) reform of the hiring process for civil servants; and (iv) strengthening of the civil service core through enhanced recruitment strategies. Fernandes identifies the reform blueprint of Plano Diretor as the most significant product of the reform inasmuch as the ideas contained therein have served as bases for a long-lasting revolution in thinking about public administration. Under Fernandes' direction, there was a coordinated and three-pronged media outreach strategy predicated on (i) a magazine targeting a wide audience of practitioners, (ii) a collection of papers for specialists who may be interested in replicating the reform, and (iii) a website in a decade when the potential of the internet remained largely untapped. Due to this visibility, Bresser succeeded in putting civil service at the top of the agenda of the reform-focused Cardoso administration. However, during the second mandate there were significant challenges to implementation. The main sources of resistance were civil service unions and specific advisers in the executive and legislative branches who identified managerial reform with the neoliberalism they denounced. Fernandes discusses specific implementation challenges in decentralization through creation of state-funded, administratively autonomous social organizations, as well as through creation of executive agencies. In both cases, the difficulties in establishing pilots and managing anxiety among the personnel contributed to limited successes. In this climate, the Ministry was ultimately absorbed by the Ministry of Planning. The resulting discontinuity among the key reform managers frustrated successful implementation of the reform at the federal level. Nonetheless, the dispersion of the reform team resulted in further dissemination of the key ideas of the Plano Diretor as the reform staff was incorporated into other teams at the state level. 
 
Profile

A career civil servant, Ciro Fernandes worked as a project manager for the Ministry of Social Security. He joined the newly-created Ministry of Administration and State Reform under Fernando Henrique Cardoso.

Full Audio File Size
112 MB
Full Audio Title
Ciro Fernandes Interview

Rose N. Kafeero

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F
Focus Area(s)
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2
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Andrew Schalkwyk
Name
Rose N. Kafeero
Interviewee's Position
Deputy Secretary of the Public Service Commission
Interviewee's Organization
Uganda
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Ugandan
Town/City
Kampala
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Rose Kafeero describes the challenges she faced to implement “results-oriented management” reforms in the Ugandan government. While she believes that the mindset changed over the years and that budgets were prepared on the basis of outcomes, she says the impetus for outcome-based performance weakened when some of the managers leading these reforms left agencies. She also did not have full backing from top officials. She believes that other civil service reforms such as downsizing and divestiture of functions have been more successful. She outlines the merit-based selection process at both the national and district levels. She says that universities do not produce skill levels that match government requirements in some categories. She describes the difficulties of recruiting or retaining civil servants in some categories because of low pay and a failure to provide core benefits such as housing.

Profile

At the time of this interview, Rose N. Kafeero was deputy secretary of the Public Service Commission in Uganda. Upon graduation from university, she was appointed as a personnel officer and subsequently was promoted to higher positions. In 1992, she was elevated to head of department in the Ministry of Public Service and subsequently to her position at the time of the interview.  In that position, she also headed the Department of Monitoring and Guidance, which served as the secretariat to the Public Service Commission.

Full Audio File Size
78 MB
Full Audio Title
Rose N. Kafeero - Full Interview

Cristopher Johnston

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H
Focus Area(s)
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1
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Michael Scharff
Name
Cristopher Johnston
Interviewee's Position
Executive Director, Government Efficiency and Financial Planning
Interviewee's Organization
Office of Management and Budget, State of Indiana
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
United States
Town/City
Indiana
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Cris Johnston describes his role as Director of the Government Efficiency and Financial Planning Unit in the Office of Management and Budget in Indiana. Johnston’s agency was responsible for a government probe that investigated the effectiveness of over 400 state programs within eighteen months. His team adopted an eighteen-question template created by Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels that asked questions about a program’s purpose, its management, its budget, whether or not it was duplicative of other state efforts, and if it had produced viable results. The unit also established metrics for measuring performance within the different state agencies. Out of the probe’s 200 recommendations, agencies have implemented roughly half.  Furthermore, when Indiana had to enact budget cuts, the unit’s findings were crucial in making agency heads aware of which programs had the most impact and where they should focus their time and money.   Johnston emphasizes that the goal is not to create the best performance measurement system, but to begin implementing changes in state government that will build momentum. 
 
Profile

Cris Johnston attended Wabash College and Butler University, where he received a bachelor’s degree in economics and a master’s degree in business administration, respectively. Upon graduating, he served as chief deputy for the Indiana Treasurer. For 13 years, Johnston worked as a partner at Crowe Chizek and Company LLC. While there, he advised local and state governments in Indiana and Illinois. In 2005, Governor Mitch Daniels of Indiana appointed Johnston to the position of Executive Director of Government Efficiency and Financial Planning within the Office of Management and Budget. 

Full Audio File Size
74 MB
Full Audio Title
Cristopher Johnston Interview

Joseph Rugumyamheto

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E
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
10
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Andrew Schalkwyk
Name
Joseph Rugumyamheto
Interviewee's Position
Former Permanent Secretary for Public Service Management
Interviewee's Organization
Tanzania
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Tanzanian
Town/City
Dar es Salaam
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
Yes
Abstract
Joseph Rugumyamheto describes sweeping human resource capacity-building efforts undertaken to transform the Tanzanian civil service from dysfunction to effectiveness. He details an array of efforts intended to supplement broader economic liberalization by downsizing while enhancing the skills, competencies and attitudes of civil servants. He explains how the role of the civil service was redefined, rationalized and focused via targeted retrenchment and strategic re-organization of departments. Additionally, he unravels New Public Management-style reforms that promoted meritocratic recruitment, introduced an appraisal system based on performance targets, recalibrated career paths and realigned payment systems. He also explains attempts to facilitate the quality of civil servants and attract skills through the formation of a Public Service Commission, needs assessments and training programs, pay raises and the overall image makeover of the civil service into a functional organization.
 
Profile

Joseph Rugumyamheto worked in several capacities in the Tanzanian civil service for 30 years, ultimately serving for five years as permanent secretary of public service management in the President’s Office. He was responsible for the management of all civil servants in the Tanzanian government in terms of human resources and development. He previously served as chairman of the Government Board of the Eastern and Southern African Management Institute and chairman of the Board of Global Development Learning Centre Network. Rugumyamheto retired in 2006, and at the time of the interview he was chairman of the board and a director of Douglas Lake Minerals Ltd., a joint-venture company holding mineral concession rights in Tanzania. In April 2006, he was awarded the Jit Gill Memorial Award for Outstanding Public Service by the World Bank.

Full Audio File Size
78 MB
Full Audio Title
Joseph Rugumyamheto - Full Interview

Baiba Petersone

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E
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
6
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Jonathan Friedman
Name
Baiba Petersone
Interviewee's Position
Director
Interviewee's Organization
Latvia School of Public Administration
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Latvian
Town/City
Riga
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
In this interview, Baiba Petersone describes various tasks ministries assigned the Policy Coordination Department, particularly the civil service reforms she led. In her first few years in the new department, the main task was to survey Latvia’s policy-making system. From this survey, Petersone explains the department knew its first task was to create a policy system. They developed a process based on several types of documents, each with a different purpose. The department also created an annotation system to include information such as the costs of a proposal. The next step was to implement an inter-ministerial consultation system. Petersone discusses how the department chose its priorities and the sequence of its reforms. Finally, she details the civil service reforms undertaken, which she was in charge of. Her working group proposed abolishing the contract system and reforming how the government sets civil servant salaries. She describes the options considered and how the economic crisis of 2008 affected their ability to implement their changes.
 
Profile

Baiba Petersone was the director of Latvia’s School of Public Administration. She began her career as a researcher in the Academy of Sciences. After entering politics during Latvia’s independence, she spent seven years as an active politician. In 1996 she entered the civil service as Director of the Department of Education Strategy in the Ministry of Education. From there she joined the State Chancellery as a member of the Policy Coordination Department. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in philosophy, though at the time the field really consisted of social science. 

Full Audio File Size
70 MB
Full Audio Title
Baiba Petersone - Full Interview