Donor Relations

Gocool Boodoo

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L
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
14
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Varanya Chaubey
Name
Gocool Boodoo
Interviewee's Position
Chief Elections Officer
Interviewee's Organization
Guyana Elections Commission
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Guyanese
Town/City
Georgetown
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Gocool Boodoo discusses his personal path to his position as chief elections officer of the Guyana Elections Commission, as well as his reflections on the institutionalization of practices, policies, and procedures that account for the relative success of the 2006 electoral process in Guyana. Boodoo notes the benefits of institutional memory with the implementation of a permanent staff for the commission and secretariat, and he highlights the importance of transparency at every level of the organization and every stage of the electoral process, from registration to voting day to declaration of results. The emphasis he places on technology for organizing and sharing information, including registration forms and polling results, reflects his feeling that electronic voting will be a reality in Guyana at some point in the near future. The roles of technology, particularly for the sharing of information internally and with regional organizations, are the central focus of the interview. He also stresses the importance of a valid electoral roll. The interview concludes with a brief discussion of constituency delimitation in the late 2009 local elections, including a proposal before Parliament of a mixed proportional representation and "first-past-the-post" system.

 

Profile

At the time of this interview, Gocool Boodoo was chief elections officer at the Guyana Elections Commission. He previously served in various public relations and administrative capacities at the commission. Prior to his work at the Commission, he was the head of the Department of Foundations and Administration of the School of Education of the University of Guyana. His initial work with the commission was in the preparation of training and policy manuals for electoral workers. After serving as deputy commissioner for administration, he became chief elections officer in 2001, and he supervised both the March 2001 and 2006 national elections.

Full Audio File Size
26 MB
Full Audio Title
Mr. Gocool Boodoo - Full interview

Richard Panton

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B
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
4
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Summer Lopez
Name
Richard Panton
Interviewee's Position
Deputy Director-General for Training and Development
Interviewee's Organization
Liberia Institute for Public Administration
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Liberian
Town/City
Monrovia
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Richard Panton describes the role he played in public sector reform in Liberia. Before the civil war, he explains, civil servants were adequate and well trained. But they began to take jobs in the private sector, non-governmental organizations and the United Nations after the war, leading to a decline in the public sector’s capacity. Also, due to transitional arrangements, recruiters did not consider education and professionalism when selecting public workers. Reform was necessary to resolve capacity issues. The Civil Service Agency was in charge of selection and recruitment, payroll and age structure, and promotion systems. The Liberia Institute of Public Administration designed a curriculum for training existing public workers. Panton was involved in designing and facilitating training programs in records management, project planning and management, human resource management, strategic management, and financial management. According to him, some of the challenges included a shortage of training equipment, budget delays and inadequate specialists in human resource management.  

Profile

At the time of this interview, Richard Panton was the deputy director-general for training and development at the Liberia Institute for Public Administration. He joined LIPA in 1998 as a special assistant to the director-general. He was also a trainer of the African Management Development Institute Network and an instructor of public administration and management at the University of Liberia and United Methodist University. Panton joined the government as a cadet in 1985 in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He worked in the Office of the Deputy Minister for Administration. He later moved to the Ministry of State for Presidential Affairs. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics with a minor concentration in political science from the University of Liberia and a master’s in development management from the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration.  

Full Audio File Size
73 MB
Full Audio Title
Richard Panton - Full Interview

Deependra Bickram Thapa

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H
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
7
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Andrew Schalkwyk
Name
Deependra Bickram Thapa
Interviewee's Position
Secretary of Education
Interviewee's Organization
Ministry of Education and Sport, Nepal
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Nepali
Place (Building/Street)
Ministry of Education and Sport
Town/City
Kathmandu
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Deependra Thapa describes the successes and failures of civil service reform efforts in Nepal before, during and after civil conflict. He reports successes in downsizing the bureaucracy and combating corruption. A Web-based personnel information system was installed. However, its use was inhibited by the resistance to change within the bureaucracy, which persisted in doing most transactions on paper. Because of a lack of support from top leadership, installation of a performance management system, with pay and promotion dependent upon outputs, was stymied for similar reasons. When Parliament was suspended during the civil conflict, training for parliamentarians and senior civil servants and officials also came to a halt. Thapa expresses concern that tensions under the coalition government at the time of the interview meant that little attention and few resources would be paid to achieve the ambitious civil service reform goals the government originally set for itself in 1999.
Profile

At the time of this interview, Deependra Thapa was Nepal's secretary of education, a position he had held for less than a year. Earlier, he was secretary of the Ministry of General Administration, where he had served for two years as national program officer in charge of the civil service reform program.  Since entering the civil service in 1997, he also served in the ministries of tourism, environment, operations, transportation and labor and in the office of the prime minister.

Full Audio File Size
76MB
Full Audio Title
Deepndra Thapa Interview

Hadi Soesastro

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K
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
1
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Andrew Schalkwyk
Name
Hadi Soesastro
Interviewee's Position
Executive Director
Interviewee's Organization
Center for Strategic and International Studies
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Indonesian
Place (Building/Street)
Jakarta Post Building
Town/City
Jakarta
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Hadi Soesastro discusses economic deregulation and political and civil service reform in Indonesia since 1986. The 1986 plunge in oil prices affected Indonesia severely, and precipitated a number of deregulation policies, backed largely by academics and government technocrats, including tariff reductions, industrial reform and investment encouragement. Soesastro recalls resistance to reform from entrenched interests, and Suharto’s reform of several sectors in which his close associates or he himself were not involved. The second wave of reform came in the wake of the 1997 Asian financial crisis, which plunged Indonesia into a severe recession. Efforts by the International Monetary Fund to help recovery were stymied by Suharto's resistance to reform, especially in industries in which he had personal interest; this eventually led to his resignation. Major reforms were later achieved in the financial and political sectors. The leading result of political reform was decentralization, under populist pressure and fear of secession. Soesastro also discusses reforms in the Finance Ministry since 2004, including anti-corruption and personnel reform. He also speaks about the failure of judicial reform in Indonesia. Finally, he reflects on challenges faced by the Indonesian government at the time of the interview.
 
Profile

Hadi Soesastro, an economist and public intellectual, was one of the founders of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and at the time of the interview he was the executive director of the center, with which he had been involved for 38 years. He was a member of the National Economic Council of Indonesia. He served as an adviser to late former President Abdurrahman Wahid, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. Soesastro held a doctoral degree in economics and had taught widely, including at Columbia University in New York. He died in May 2010. 

Full Audio File Size
77MB
Full Audio Title
Hadi Soesastro Interview

Steve Surujbally

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L
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
9
Critical Tasks
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Varanya Chaubey
Name
Steve Surujbally
Interviewee's Position
Chairman
Interviewee's Organization
Election Commission, Guyana
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Guyanese
Place (Building/Street)
GECOM
Town/City
Georgetown
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Steve Surujbally discusses the 2006 election in Guyana.  From the broad to the very specific, he touches on a wide variety of issues of logistical operations surrounding the 2006 election. Surujbally brings up voter registration and the issues surrounding preserving the anonymity of voters in rural districts while reporting voting trends of individual districts in an effort to maintain transparency. He also discusses campaign conduct and tensions leading up to the election. 
 
Profile

At the time of the interview, Steve Surujbally was the chairman of the Election Commission in Guyana. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in veterinary science, and was a practicing veterinarian.  He was appointed chairman of the Election Commission after stints with other government agencies, including the Ministry of Agriculture. Surujbally also was a columnist, writing both satirical political articles and response articles in veterinary science.  

Full Audio File Size
75MB
Full Audio Title
Steve Surujbally Interview

William Hogan

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A
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
5
Critical Tasks
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Ashley McCants
Name
William Hogan
Interviewee's Position
United Nations Logistics Adviser
Interviewee's Organization
National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Australian
Town/City
Freetown
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

William Hogan discusses his experiences as a United Nations logistics adviser for Sierra Leone's National Electoral Commission.  He talks about the potential for institutions like the commission to become dependent on aid organizations and donors, and the problems that this presents for creating sustainable and independent institutions, as well as for ensuring that the programs reflect the interests of the country and not the interests of donors.  Hogan emphasizes the importance of long-term capacity building and the need for self-criticism among civil servants within the commission, in order for them to grow in their capacity and in their functional independence.  He mentions the difficulties with working through linguistic barriers and with limited tools and infrastructure, and concludes by emphasizing the importance of understanding each country’s unique characteristics and context in policy decisions.     

Profile
At the time of this interview, William Hogan was a United Nations logistics adviser to the National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone.  He joined the U.N. as a volunteer in 1993 and served in a number of countries, including Afghanistan, Cambodia and Mozambique.   Subsequent to this interview, Hogan worked in Moldova, Kenya and Tanzania with the U.N., and in Uganda on the South Sudan referendum.  He then worked in the Solomon Islands with AusAID as the election operations adviser to the Electoral Commission.   In his native Australia, Hogan spent about 15 years at the Electoral Commission.

 

Full Audio File Size
41 MB
Full Audio Title
William Hogan - Full Interview

Building Civilian Police Capacity: Post-Conflict Liberia, 2003-2011

Author
Jonathan (Yoni) Friedman and Christine MacAulay
Focus Area(s)
Country of Reform
Abstract
As Liberia began to emerge from civil war in 2003, the warring sides agreed to overhaul the discredited national police service. In the Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed in Accra, Ghana, the parties designated the United Nations as the lead body in rebuilding and reforming Liberia’s civilian police capacity. In a joint effort between Liberian and U.N. police, led initially by U.N. Police Commissioner Mark Kroeker and Liberian Inspector General Chris Massaquoi, reformers vetted and trained a new police service of more than 4,000 officers, established specialized units to combat gender-based violence and high-risk threats, improved internal accountability mechanisms, and began to reverse the sordid reputation for unlawful killings and rape the police had earned during Liberia’s civil war. This case offers insights into the development of the Liberia National Police, one of the successes in post-war Liberia and an uncommon example of successful post-war police reform.
 

Jonathan (Yoni) Friedman drafted this case study on the basis of interviews conducted in Monrovia, Liberia, during June and July 2011, and on the basis of interviews conducted by Arthur Boutellis in Monrovia in May 2008 and text prepared by Christine MacAulay.  Case published September 2011. A separate case study, “Building an Inclusive, Responsive National Police Service: Gender-Sensitive Reform in Liberia, 2005-2011” describes efforts to increase gender diversity and respond to high rates of sexual and gender-based violence in Liberia.

Associated Interview(s):  Bruce Baker, Ibrahim Idris, Joseph Kekula, Mark Kroeker, Robert Perito, Paavani Reddy, Aaron Weah, Peter F. Zaizay

David Beer

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B
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
1
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Arthur Boutellis
Name
David Beer
Interviewee's Position
Chief Superintendent, Director General of International Policing
Interviewee's Organization
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Canadian
Town/City
Ottawa
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
Yes
Abstract

Chief Superintendent Dave Beer of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police recounts his experiences in leading policing/justice development missions, particularly in Haiti, in the early 1990s and then about a decade later.  His length of service in the arena of international peacekeeping and the parameters under which he has served, both as a representative of the Canadian government during a bilateral mission and under the aegis of the United Nations during a multilateral mission through the Department of Peacekeeping Operation, carries with it a broad viewpoint as to the development of policing in Haiti. His experience in other states, particularly Iraq and Liberia, provides a comparative study of best practices. He particularly offers insight into pre-deployment training by the U.N. and the Canadian government and on-the-ground knowledge of local recruitment strategies and requirements.  The sentiments of this quote reverberate throughout the interview,  "It is an axiom, I think, of this world of international development that you have to find local solutions led by local individuals supported by the local government for it to be either a) instituted; b) successful; and c) sustainable. You’re not going to have any one of those three unless it’s a locally-created program."

Case Study:  Building an Inclusive, Responsive National Police Service: Gender-Sensitive Reform in Liberia, 2005-2011

Profile

At the time of this interview, Chief Superintendent Dave Beer was serving as the director general of international policing for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, a position that included peace-operations deployments, liaison with INTERPOL, and oversight of the international operations branch, the visits and travel branch, and the international affairs and policy branch.  Beer led or participated in policing development missions under the auspices of the Canadian International Development Agency, the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations and the U.S. State Department.  Although he spent the most time in Haiti, partially due to his being bilingual in French and English, he also served in Liberia, Central African Republic and Iraq.   

Full Audio File Size
37 MB
Full Audio Title
Dave Beer - Full Interview

Diego Molano

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J
Ref Batch Number
10
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Matthew Devlin
Name
Diego Molano
Interviewee's Position
High Commissioner
Interviewee's Organization
Acción Social
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Colombian
Town/City
Bogotá
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract
Diego Molano discusses the creation and development of Colombia's Center for Coordination of Integrated Action (CCAI). The organization was based on three principles: inter-agency coordination, instilling of trust in the military, and keeping a low profile by ensuring that no institution became prominent. The CCAI targeted areas characterized by the presence of armed groups, internal population displacement and the growing of illicit crops. It worked with the military to use five tools that consisted of humanitarian assistance, social programs for education and health, social infrastructure, economic development projects, and finally, culture, sports, and leisure, which contributed to building trust and confidence in the government and other institutions. Molano also discusses the use of the Padrino Model that included a “Godfather” who was accountable for the results in one of the 14 institutions in the CCAI. The CCAI later adopted the La Macarena model that supplanted institutions instead of creating them. Initially, the CCAI operated on solely domestic resources, but it later received support from the United States Agency for International Development and the international community. 
 
Profile
At the time of this interview, Diego Molano was the high commissioner for Acción Social, the Presidential Agency for Social Action and International Cooperation. He was previously the coordinator of MIDAS (Additional Investment for Sustainable Alternative Development), which is a USAID program. Molano was also one of the founders of the Center for Coordination of Integrated Action. He served as the director of the presidential programs of Acción Social. He also worked as the coordinator of the social component of Plan Colombia. He was a professor at the Faculty of Political Science and Government and International Relations at Universidad del Rosario in Bogotá. He earned a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University in New York.
Full Audio File Size
29.6MB
Full Audio Title
Diego Molano Interview

Rizwan Khair

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G
Focus Area(s)
Ref Batch Number
2
Country of Reform
Interviewers
Andrew Schalkwyk
Name
Rizwan Khair
Interviewee's Position
Academic Coordinator
Interviewee's Organization
Institute of Governance Studies
Language
English
Nationality of Interviewee
Bangladeshi
Town/City
Dhaka
Country
Date of Interview
Reform Profile
No
Abstract

Rizwan Khair reviews the reasons he thinks civil service reform had not taken place in Bangladesh. He argues that the mindset of government leaders and the senior civil servants was risk averse and that Bangladesh was stuck in the mindset of the old colonial civil service, with its emphasis on seniority rather than performance. He believes that the development of Bangladesh in a globalized world economy requires that a premium be set on performance, accountability and innovation in the civil service. He suggests that international donors had not been persistent enough in pressing for civil service reform in Bangladesh. More importantly, he calls for his country to look at reforms in Malaysia and India to see why Bangladesh must follow suit in order to build its long-term future.    

Case Study:  Energizing the Civil Service: Managing at The Top 2, Bangladesh, 2006-2011

Profile

At the time of this interview, Rizwan Khair was academic coordinator at the Institute of Governance Studies in Bangladesh. He was seconded from the civil service in 2006 to oversee the Masters in Governance and Development program at the institute. After working in a private bank for four years following his graduation from university, he entered the civil service, where he worked initially in the field before joining the Ministry of Finance's Economic Relations Division. He then transferred to the Bangladesh Public Administration Training Centre, where he worked for six years before moving to the institute.

Full Audio File Size
74 MB
Full Audio Title
Rizwan Khair - Full Interview