Rejuvenating the Public Registry: Republic of Georgia, 2006-2008

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Abstract 

In the wake of Georgia’s “Rose Revolution,” Jaba Ebanoidze took charge of the inefficient Public Registry. Housed within the Ministry of Justice, the registry held information about land, property rights and titling. Work procedures within the registry were overly bureaucratic and facilitated corruption by requiring multiple stages for application processes. The reform of the agency was part of the government’s wider economic program, which sought to open the country to private investment. A well-functioning registry was a key requirement for attracting foreign investors and allowing citizens to borrow easily against the capital in their homes. By rolling out information-technology systems and emphasizing monitoring and transparency, Ebanoidze achieved reductions in both processing times and corruption.

Andrew Schalkwyk drafted this case study based on interviews conducted in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia, in May 2009. 

Associated Interview(s):  Jaba Ebanoidze

Keywords 
identity documents
registry
corruption
technology
Georgia
documents processing
civil service
institutional capacity
delegation
monitoring
governance
corruption & patronage
Focus Area(s): 
Civil Service
Critical Tasks: 
Civil service corruption
Computerization of records
Evaluating performance
Performance management system
Core Challenge: 
Principal-agent problem (delegation)
Country of Reform: 
Georgia
Type: 
Case Studies
Author: 
Andrew Schalkwyk