Jay Wysocki

Local Governance Adviser
United Nations Development Programme, Vietnam
Focus Area(s): 
Civil Service
Critical Tasks: 
Civil service corruption
Civil service recruitment
Interviewers: 
David Hausman
Country of Reform: 
Vietnam
Town/City: 
Hanoi
Country: 
Viet Nam
Date of Interview: 
Sunday, August 30, 2009
Abstract 
Jay Wysocki talks about civil service reforms in Vietnam.  The main impetus for the reforms was the Thai Binh riots involving corrupt government officials and land appropriation.  Other factors included the inflow of foreign direct investment that required political and administrative changes, the need for a growing economy to absorb the rising number of people in the job market, and the improvement of public services.  The reforms focused on institutions, performance, staffing and organizational structure.  Wysocki explains the capacity-building programs at the National Academy of Public Administration.  He also discusses decentralization and the privatization or “socialization” of services like education and healthcare.  The reform process was affected by corruption and lack of empirical data, which complicated program evaluations. 
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Full Interview: 
99.4MB
Jay Wysocki Interview
Profile: 

At the time of this interview, Jay Wysocki was the United Nations Development Programme's local governance adviser in Vietnam. He first came to Vietnam in 1995 to participate in a British project run by Oxfam. He later designed a project to improve the quality of public administration training at the National Academy of Public Administration. He also served as the project’s chief technical adviser.  

Language: 
English
Nationality of Interviewee: 
American
No
Jay Wysocki
M
3
Keywords 
Decentralization
Pay Reform
budgeting
Capacity building
Donor Relations
promotion
Merit Pay
recruitment
training
Patronage
corruption