Clay Wescott

Visiting Lecturer
Princeton University
Focus Area(s): 
Civil Service
Critical Tasks: 
Downsizing
One-stop shops
Salary structure reform
Interviewers: 
Andrew Schalkwyk
Country of Reform: 
Nepal
Vietnam
Timor-Leste
Cambodia
Town/City: 
Princeton, New Jersey
Place (Building/Street): 
Princeton University
Country: 
United States
Date of Interview: 
Thursday, February 5, 2009
Abstract 

Clay Wescott draws on his global experience and talks about civil service reform programs in countries around the world.  He talks about his involvement in such programs in Vietnam, including aspects such as downsizing and the introduction of one-stop shops.  He also recalls the introduction of an effective but contentious computer-based budgeting system in Kenya in the 1980s.  Wescott reflects on the difficulty of reforming a civil service that had been used as a tool of a peace process, such as in Cambodia, where positions were parceled out in order to get different factions to buy into the process.  He also identifies the importance of building reforms to last beyond a current window of opportunity, and of selling a vision of reform that people want to buy into.  He also talks about civil service censuses and outsourcing in Nepal and capacity-building programs in Eritrea, Timor-Leste and Afghanistan.

Case Study:  Policy Leaps and Implementation Obstacles: Civil Service Reform in Vietnam, 1998-2009

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Full Interview: 
84.4MB
Clay Wesctott- Full Interview
Profile: 

At the time of this interview, Clay Wescott was a visiting lecturer at Princeton University and the principal regional cooperation specialist for the Asian Development Bank.  His work has covered e-government, regional cooperation, governance assessment, civil service reform, public finance, decentralization, citizen participation and combating corruption.  He worked all over the world, including Kenya, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Cambodia, Ghana, Nepal, Eritrea, Timor-Leste and other countries.  Before joining the ADB, he worked in the governance division of the United Nations Development Programme, assisting countries to formulate and carry out reform programs in Asia and the Pacific, Africa and the Caribbean.  He earned a bachelor's degree in government from Harvard University and a doctorate from Boston University, and he was an editorial board member of the International Public Management Journal and the International Public Management Review.

 

Language: 
English
Nationality of Interviewee: 
USA
Yes
Clay Wescott
G
7
Keywords 
kenya
Bangladesh
Vietnam
Cambodia
Ghana
Nepal
Eritrea
Timor Leste
budgeting
Decentralization
Downsizing
Pay Reform
Capacity building